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View Full Version : News: Favorite Book Thread Reduxxx, by Categories!



Gloomrender
01-04-2012, 00:32
List your top 1-5 favorite books for each category! (whatever categories you actually read, anyway...and if I missed any, add it ^__ ^ ). Also articles and non-physical publications of extraordinary quality are welcome in addition to books!

Historical
Historical Fiction
Science and Technology
Science Fiction
Literary Fiction/Genre Fiction (general fiction types)
Fantasy
Mystery
Medical, Health & Fitness, Self Help, Cooking
Business, Finance, and Entrepreneurship
Psychology
Philosophical

Khorsy
01-04-2012, 00:42
Year of the Hare.

Styrr Chipatama
01-04-2012, 00:59
Fantasy :
The saga of the discworld.

nizzie
01-04-2012, 03:58
(whatever categories you actually read, anyway...and if I missed any, add it ^__ ^ )

Religion.

Rachsucht
01-04-2012, 05:21
Art - Backdoor Sluts 9 (the novel)

Gloomrender
01-04-2012, 08:08
Oh well, I'll keep bumping and hopefully some of the more intelligent posters will get on :p

Gloomrender
01-04-2012, 08:08
Religion.

No interest. But if you like it, go ahead and list your favs for the benefit of others. I guess anti or non-theist could be a category too.

Jedicake
01-04-2012, 08:14
Fuck. I really need to start reading books.

Gloomrender
01-04-2012, 08:16
Fuck. I really need to start reading books.

Me too. That's why I made the thread. Gonna load my kindle up and read like crazy.

Makestro
01-04-2012, 08:26
2001: a space odyssey
hitch hikers guide series
lord of the rings series
A game of thrones(only read the first book)

are all books I read and enjoyed, I have a lot of books on my list to read, however I find myself watching movies and playing games more than reading novels when it comes to entertainment.

mcap
01-04-2012, 09:20
General fiction / philosophical:
Infinite Jest - David Foster Wallace
Pale King - David Foster Wallace


Fantasy (in order of personal preference):
Malazan series - Steven Erikson (the ones by Ian Esslemont aren't bad either)
The First Law trilogy, Best Served Cold and The Heroes - Joe Abercrombie
Black Company series - Glen Cook
Song of Ice and Fire series - George R. R. Martin
Prince of Nothing and Aspect Emperor trilogies - R. Scott Bakker
Vlad Taltos series - Steven Brust
A Land Fit for Heroes series - Richard K. Morgan (note: don't read if explicit gay sex offends you)
Dark Tower series - Steven King
The Kingkiller Chronicles - Patrick Rothfuss

Hitom
01-04-2012, 10:57
Sci-fi: John dies at the end.

Other: Art of war, Hagakure, McMafia

Weeking
01-04-2012, 11:33
Historical Fiction - Nagel (Knut Hamsun) It's historical now anyways.
Science and Technology - On the origin of species by means of natural selection, Charles Darwin
Science Fiction - Dune series, Frank Herbert
Literary Fiction/Genre Fiction (general fiction types) The Constitution of The United States - Thomas Jefferson
Fantasy - The Hobbit, J.R.R Tolkien
Self Help - Dexter series, Jeff Lindsay + The Art of War, Zun Tsu
Business, Finance, and Entrepreneurship - The Fountainhead, Ayn Rand
Psychology - The God Delusion, Richard Dawkins
Philosophical - Friedrich Nietzsche, "Thus Spake Zarathusra" I guess

Njai
01-04-2012, 12:35
How hard are the game of throne books to read?

I have read less then 5 books for fun and for about all of my classes up to even currently in college I either skimmed through the book or read online summaries. Seriously, probably the last book that I read that wasn't assigned was the first harry potter. : (

Weeking
01-04-2012, 12:45
How hard are the game of throne books to read?

I have read less then 5 books for fun and for about all of my classes up to even currently in college I either skimmed through the book or read online summaries. Seriously, probably the last book that I read that wasn't assigned was the first harry potter. : (

There are audiobooks of it.

raja
01-04-2012, 21:16
raja yoga - swami vivekananda
tertium organum - p.d. ouspensky

edit: both philosophy/psychology

paade
01-04-2012, 22:11
Historical/autobiography One Soldier's War in Chechnya
Historical Fiction The Pillars of the Earth, Shōgun, books written by Bernard Cornwell (excluding Sharpe series), anything Umberto Eco has written
Science Fiction The Black Cloud
Fantasy Silmarillion
Business, Finance, and Entrepreneurship A Concise Economic History of the World: From Paleolithic Times to the Present

tehWise
01-04-2012, 22:37
Doors of Perception or Brave New World by Aldous Huxley are good classics.

Neil Postman's "Amusing Ourselves to Death" is fascinating but really fucking hard to read (dry, dense)...but equally as fascinating nonetheless.

Rachsucht
01-05-2012, 02:17
Me too. That's why I made the thread. Gonna load my kindle up and read like crazy.

Pirating books is for cunts.

Diesel Mechanic
01-05-2012, 02:53
Gaunt's Ghosts series by Dan Abnett

Sci-Fi (warhammer 40k)

Xife
01-05-2012, 03:08
Historical/autobiography One Soldier's War in Chechnya
Historical Fiction The Pillars of the Earth, Shōgun, books written by Bernard Cornwell (excluding Sharpe series), anything Umberto Eco has written
Science Fiction The Black Cloud
Fantasy Silmarillion
Business, Finance, and Entrepreneurship A Concise Economic History of the World: From Paleolithic Times to the Present

I just started the Saxon Stories (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Saxon_Stories) by Bernard Cornwell and it is really good so far. Only one book in though.

melipone
01-05-2012, 03:18
Recently got through Neuromancer and started the next in the series but not really reading all that much atm..anyway:

Sci-fi - Everything by Philip k Dick, Micheal Marshall Smith (Spares etc), Vernor Vinge (A fire upon the deep), Iain M Banks (Culture + his non-sci-fi is decent), Greg Bear (Eon). Probably others I should mention but not really reading much atm

Fantasy: LotR, Prince of Nothing, Game of Thrones, Stephen Covenant. I quite dislike a large bunch of LotR style ripoffs (huge part of fantasy 3 part series) and try to stick to low fantasy now unless its particularly decent or original. Bored of the traditional quests and elves and "chosen one" type stuff. Last series I read was Joe Abercrombie's First Law trilogy which was decent.

I liked Prince of Nothing a lot for the realism, politics, philosophy and it doesn't try to rationalise everything with fantasy style goodies vs baddies plots. It does have magic but it is low fantasy I think. Kinda like Game of Thrones I guess but I didn't get past book 1 in GoT yet, always mean to get started on book 2 but haven't yet. Everyone has to read LotR at some point imo although it does have a religious sort of feel to it (it is very goodies vs baddies, black vs white style fantasy but its still very good for that type of story). The movies don't do a bad job but theres so much more to the books other than the mostly action focus like the movies. Chronicles of Thomas Covenant is worth reading for the how it keeps it open whether the fantasy land the main character find himself in is real or if the guy is losing his mind. One of the most interesting characterisations I've read in a fantasy series anyway

ZeroCool
01-05-2012, 03:47
Philip k. dick makes some amazing sci fi novels. Disturbing as fuck too.

Hydrogenium
01-05-2012, 04:03
@paade Umberto Eco is really not that good. It's what I call "pretentious commercial literature".

I fully endorse Weeking: the classics is where it's at.

If you want a medium to high level philosophical discussion immersed in a fictional story, classic science fiction is your answer. Nothing beats a Frank Herbert or an Isaac Asimov or any of the big ones of the time (Roger Zelazny, A&B Strugatski, Greg Bear, Ursula K. LeGuin, Orson Scott Card, Paul Anderson etc. etc.). I truly can say that I got the most out of them in terms of both entertainment and world view shaping.
Sorry to say but regular fiction (Stephen King) or heroic fantasy (Lord of the rings, Malazaan Empire series or A song of Ice and Fire etc.) don't come even close. Jules Verne puts them to shame in terms of pure entertainment and story telling and that guy lived in the 1800s.

The only other gender I would endorse for both educational and entertainment value is historical novels (they are not really fiction, more like adaptations). James Clavell really shines here. I would read his works in the following order: Shogun, Tai Pan, Noble House and Whirlwind. Gai-Jin and King Rat are pretty good too, but a bit weak on the historic part.

Hydrogenium
01-05-2012, 04:04
Philip k. dick makes some amazing sci fi novels. Disturbing as fuck too.

This.

Hydrogenium
01-05-2012, 04:06
Oh yah, in the spirit of my message I recommend going down the list of the Hugo and Nebula prize winners. Even in today's time they don't disappoint, although the older titles are clearly superior.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_joint_winners_of_the_Hugo_and_Ne bula_awards

BulletToothTony
01-05-2012, 06:25
List your top 1-5 favorite books for each category! (whatever categories you actually read, anyway...and if I missed any, add it ^__ ^ ). Also articles and non-physical publications of extraordinary quality are welcome in addition to books!

Historical
Historical Fiction
Science and Technology
Science Fiction
Literary Fiction/Genre Fiction (general fiction types)
Fantasy
Mystery
Medical, Health & Fitness, Self Help, Cooking
Business, Finance, and Entrepreneurship
Psychology
Philosophical

Book of 5 rings (historical letters from a samaria to his student on how to kick ass)

Mote in Gods Eye (syfy) writers Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle

At the Mountains of Madness (but anything by H.P Lovecraft) literary fiction

The Black Company (first 3 books) Glen Cook
~or~
The Way of Shadows writer Brent Weeks (*Edit- guy wrote the book like he had no idea what you could/couldnt do with main characters, hands down in my top 3 all time most enjoyable reads)

/really want to punch anybody who listed the game of thrones in the face. *while* a great overall story, 300 hundred pages of twenty different storylines is not a fucking book, and the series had at least two? books that were so poorly written I couldnt believe it.

Gloomrender
01-05-2012, 06:55
Pirating books is for cunts.

You should join the 21st century where digital libraries exist.

Gloomrender
01-05-2012, 06:57
@paade Umberto Eco is really not that good. It's what I call "pretentious commercial literature".

I fully endorse Weeking: the classics is where it's at.

If you want a medium to high level philosophical discussion immersed in a fictional story, classic science fiction is your answer. Nothing beats a Frank Herbert or an Isaac Asimov or any of the big ones of the time (Roger Zelazny, A&B Strugatski, Greg Bear, Ursula K. LeGuin, Orson Scott Card, Paul Anderson etc. etc.). I truly can say that I got the most out of them in terms of both entertainment and world view shaping.
Sorry to say but regular fiction (Stephen King) or heroic fantasy (Lord of the rings, Malazaan Empire series or A song of Ice and Fire etc.) don't come even close. Jules Verne puts them to shame in terms of pure entertainment and story telling and that guy lived in the 1800s.

The only other gender I would endorse for both educational and entertainment value is historical novels (they are not really fiction, more like adaptations). James Clavell really shines here. I would read his works in the following order: Shogun, Tai Pan, Noble House and Whirlwind. Gai-Jin and King Rat are pretty good too, but a bit weak on the historic part.

Nice, lots of stuf I've never heard of. I'll have to check all of this out.

Also thanks everyone else so far, quite a few good books to look into!

Keep em coming...would love for this to be a big thread like the last one and a true resource for everyone.

paade
01-05-2012, 07:39
@paade Umberto Eco is really not that good. It's what I call "pretentious commercial literature".

.

well someone is pretentious:rolleyes:

Liano
01-05-2012, 18:03
Haven't read in a while but in the scifi category, "carrion comfort" from Dan simmons was pretty good

melipone
01-05-2012, 22:29
How hard are the game of throne books to read?

I have read less then 5 books for fun and for about all of my classes up to even currently in college I either skimmed through the book or read online summaries. Seriously, probably the last book that I read that wasn't assigned was the first harry potter. : (

If you don't read much I wouldn't recommend something like GoT. Should start with something shortish that doesn't switch to different perspectives.

The Hobbit is a good start. It was originally written for children ~12 years I think, but its still a good read for anyone, and will mean the movie doesn't spoil how you see the story. Worst thing to do when you don't read much is start with something you won't finish or something too complex. Get a few shorter things read before tackling GoT.

BTW don't think anyone mentioned Sherlock Holmes stories. Still very readable now despite how old they are, and a lot are short stories amongst longer novels

Simmy
01-05-2012, 23:13
Malazan Book of the Fallen series.
Jim Butcher's books.
The Wheel of Time series.
The Gentleman Bastard series by Scott Lynch.
The Joe Pitt Casebooks by Charlie Huston.
The Prince of Nothing series by R. Scott Bakker.
Pretty much anything by Glen Cook.

sc0r0wnz
01-05-2012, 23:46
If you are interested in Financial bubbles(which occur way more then you actually notice) then I suggest you read :

The Alchemy of Finance - by George Soros
The New Paradigm for Financial Markets: The Credit Crisis of 2008 and What it Means - by George Soros
The Crash of 2008 and What it Means - by George soros

Also my friend always said I should read 1984 by George Orwell, haven't read it yet but I can tell you that it is a good book.

Also Catch-22 by Joseph Heller is a good book, it is about never ending spirals and the choices we make.